J Dilla Sunbeams Homework Clip

interviews

She & Him

This week's guests are . The“she”is actress and the“him”is musician , known to fans as . The two met during the making of the movie“The Go-Getter,”and quickly learned they were successful collaborators. They visited the show in after the release of their first album . The record is a collection of songs written by Zooey, as well as a couple of covers. Zooey explains that she's most influenced by classic songwriting, much of which pre-dates . You can hear the , and influence on the duo's music as they perform their songs "" and "" as well as two bonus tracks.

Go to episode 196
specials

SXSW 2008

Every year Jim and Greg return from with a list of“freshman”bands they recommend listeners check out. You can read Jim and Greg's complete SXSW reports here. And check out last year's picks to see where they are now. Here's the class:

Jim

    Greg

      Go to episode 121
      reviews
      Unbreakable available on iTunes

      Janet Jackson Unbreakable

      For the first time in seven years, has released a new album called . At the beginning of her career, she faced the challenge of stepping out of the shadow of her older brothers, which she did with the help of songwriters and producers . They worked together creating her signature sound on many of Janet's most famous albums, including and , and teamed up again for Unbreakable. thinks Jackson's last record, 's , was probably her worst ever but she rebounded with a solid mid-career album. He appreciated that Janet stopped wasting her time with weak and overtly sexual material, and instead made music that is more true to her authentic self. Greg especially enjoyed the track "," featuring one of his all-time favorite artists, . He gives the record a . agrees and highlights the strengths of Jam and Lewis' , modernized sound. He thinks Janet is as confident and talented as ever. It's a double for Unbreakable.

      JimGreg

      Go to episode 515Kindred available on iTunes

      Passion Pit Kindred

      Frontman of the act has come a long way since "" became a hit in . He's now returned with a third album of shimmery , . is amazed by how Angelakos, who suffers from bipolar disorder, finds catharsis in making irresistible . Although he addresses his pain in Kindred, Angelakos never mopes but rather celebrates life. rarely has real soul like this. is also pleased to find this record more optimistic than the previous release, . Angelakos has a knack for making commercial music that avoids pop cliches through his brilliant symphonic keyboard arrangements. According to Greg, it's a great record with finely honed songs from beginning to end. Both critics give Kindred a .

      JimGreg

      Go to episode 49499¢ available on iTunes

      Santigold 99¢

      was known as Santogold when she released her debut album in , a combo of and that established her as an artist. On her third and most recent album, , she worked with , , , , and . Santigold named the album 99¢ because that's how much she thinks it's worth, and concedes he would pay at least double that for it. But it's not a stellar album from start to finish. The middle of the album is weighed down by a few sluggish tracks, especially the duet with , but combine that with the handful of fun dance songs, and it's a album for Jim. has always loved Santigold's ability to put smart lyrics inside catchy packages. And on this album, there are a few tracks that do just that. is one of Greg's favorites. It juxtaposes the darkness of drug addiction against an up-tempo, celebratory sound. Not every track is as successful though, and Greg is ultimately a little let down. 99¢ is a for Greg as well.

      JimGreg

      Go to episode 536Universal Mind Control available on iTunes

      Common Universal Mind Control

      One of the big new releases this month is from rapper . was initially supposed to be released over the summer, and Jim and Greg wonder if the party atmosphere would have been better suited for the warmer months. But, even the sunshine can't improve this disappointing album. Both and have lauded the native for years, so it breaks their hearts to see him reduced to what Jim describes as a“horrible, sexist, derogatory empty”album. With being such a landmark year, particularly for African-Americans, Greg thinks was a missed opportunity for the usually thoughtful rapper. Both critics give Common's record a .

      JimGreg

      Go to episode 162Contra available on iTunes

      Vampire Weekend Contra

      The first review of the new year goes to . Their album is the follow-up to their debut—one that explains had a backlash even before its release. The certainly seems to polarize. In fact, Jim absolutely hated the debut. But do they deserve such passionate hatred or praise? With , they are trying to be more ambitious musically. There are elements of reggae, dub and even autotune. But, Greg still hears a perfectly nice pop band—nothing more, nothing less. He gives the record a . admits Vampire Weekend has a terrific drummer and undeniable hooks, but he can't get past the preppy yacht schtick. He wishes they were more critical and thoughtful in their lyrics and gives a .

      JimGreg

      Go to episode 215
      lists

      Best Albums of 2008

      and listened to hundreds of albums this year. Which ones soared to the top? Check out their lists for the of below. You can also see what albums made the cut in years past in our Lists section.

      Listeners' Picks

      And here's what some of our listeners nominated:

      • Brian from Lyons, CO - ,
      • Naomi from Brooklyn, NY - ,
      • Adam from Athens, GA - ,

      Jim

      1. , (Listen to the original review, listen to the band's appearance on the show
      2. , (Listen to the original review)
      3. , (Listen to the original review)
      4. , (Listen to the original review)
      5. , (Listen to the original review)
      6. , (One of Greg's Buried Treasures)
      7. , (Listen to the original review, listen to Saul's appearance on the show)
      8. , (Listen to the original review)
      9. , (Listen to the original review)
      10. , (Listen to the original review)

      Visit Jim's blog for his complete Top 50.

      Greg

      1. , (Listen to the original review, listen to the band's appearance on the show
      2. ,
      3. , (Listen to the original review)
      4. , (Listen to the original review)
      5. , (Listen to the original review)
      6. , (Listen to the original review, listen to the band's appearance on the show)
      7. , (Listen to the original review)
      8. , (Listen to Rhymefest's appearance on the show
      9. , (Listen to the original review)
      10. , (Listen to the original review)
      Go to episode 159
      news

      Music News

      After making fans wait two decades, has announced it will be releasing an album of new (mostly instrumental) material in November. will be a tribute to , the band's keyboardist who died in , and will be primarly made up of music that Wright, guitarist and drummer put together during a session in 1993, leading to the last studio album, 's . One name you won't hear uttered…, who departed in the 1980's.

      While digital music is taking the rest of the world by storm, 's are…big in Japan. In fact, digital sales are plummeting in the n nation. We discussed this curiosity during our ese last year. And now the New York Times is diving further into this music industry head-scratcher. To be sure, CD sales are are falling worldwide, including in Japan. But they still account for 85% of sales in the country, compared with as little as 20% in fellow World Tour stop . and discuss the reasons for this including a Japanese desire to“own stuff,”and stalled efforts to bring streaming services there. they still account for about 85 percent of sales here, compared with as little as 20 percent in some countries, like Sweden, where online streaming is dominant.

      Having had a tumultuous year, has decided not to participate in next year's contest. The Eastern European nation came in 6th at the 2014 songwriting competition, which is not too shabby, Greg notes. But the state broadcaster , which finances the entry, said they don't have enough money to do something well.

      Go to episode 461

      Music News

      A glance at the numbers coming out of the traditional music industry institutions don't paint a pretty picture. But, as and explain, for everyone outside the major labels and distributors, hasn't actually been such a bad year. is reporting a 34% increase in sales. This includes downloads as well as players and accessories, but compare these stats with the 20% dip the record companies are reporting, and you get even more proof that the old model needs tweaking.

      There's another surprising news item coming out of the digital music realm. If you had asked Jim and Greg years ago to bet on what artist would dominate digital music sales today, they would never have guessed . The power balladeers' hit "" just became top selling catalog track in history with over 2 million downloads. How did this song eclipse heavy hitters like "" and "?" Greg attributes the song's late blooming success to 3 things: its association with the , its use in the ' finale, and its use during 's most recent tour. Jim would prefer to never have to hear from again, but Greg will defend the song's catchiness, particularly that unforgettable keyboard riff.

      In sadder news, n singer died last week at the age of 76. Greg says that Makeba is to South Africa what , and are to their home countries. Her passion for South Africa and for all of the continent mirrored her voice and her music, and in the case of her recording contract, jeopardized it. Makeba is best remembered through the conviction you can hear in songs, so Jim and Greg play the updated version of "" from her 2000 album .

      Go to episode 155

      Music News

      2008 has come to a close, and the numbers are in. According to 's end-of-year report, was the top-selling artist of . and also had good years, but overall album sales were down a whopping 14%. It's not all bad news for the music industry, however. While physical sales for complete albums continue to plummet, music sales overall are up; more than 1 billion digital tracks were sold. And, profits from concert sales are up 8%. This figure is the result of fewer tickets being sold for more money, and and wonder if consumers will be able to keep up with rising ticket prices in this failing economy.

      It looks like digital music sales will only continue to increase. of has made it even easier for music fans to purchase and download music from the store by removing all software from its files. But, accessibility comes at a price—$1.29 to be exact. and other online stores have been selling DRM-free files for almost a year, but iTunes was the last to hold out with the labels' demands. So if both Apple and the music industry are winners, where does that leave the consumer?

      Pioneering of died this week at the age of 60. While he died at young age, Asheton lived long enough to experience a Stooges reunion and revived fan interest. He is best remembered through his music, in albums like . And you can listen to Asheton's 2006 interview with Jim and Greg during this Sound Opinions episode.

      Go to episode 163

      Music News

      recently returned from the in Two of the central themes of the summit were how people will get more access to the internet and how artists will get paid. and both spoke about these issues and passionately expressed support for . But Franken and Genachowski also stressed that any internet activity that violates artist copyright could not be tolerated. Because it's difficult to tell if activity is legal or illegal, the question remains: how do you reconcile these two ideals?

      Call her vain, but needs a little more tender, loving care. She is , saying that the coffee company's now-defunct music label, , didn't adequately her album . and see this is as the final piece in the Hear Music tale. At first it was seen as a great, alternative way for musicians like and to market their music, and a way for the coffee company to morph into a tastemaking brand. Now, only a couple of years later, everyone agrees Starbucks should stick to lattes.

      Go to episode 203

      Music News

      may be the most well-known music awards, but the is perhaps the best barometer of what was good in the world of music. The ballots are in for , and among the almost 600 critics surveyed, 's came out on top. As explains, the critics often do it better, but the poll is not perfect, especially since the departure of longtime “Dean”. Usually the Village Voice list is vastly different from the list of Grammy nominations, but this year there are some crossovers, especially in terms of singles. 's and 's got top marks in Pazz & Jop, as well as a number of noms.

      On January 20, President not only inherited 2 wars and a failing economy. He also inherited a pretty kick-ass record collection. According to a recent story in , there are several hundred LP's in the White House basement, including , and , all provided by the and marked with the presidential seal. The list of records was not always so cool though. During the administration, album artists included and . So, and want to volunteer their own services to make sure that the collection thrives in the year to come. They say: "Ask not what your country can do for you. Ask what you can do for your country's record collection."

      Go to episode 166
      featured songs

      Featured Songs

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      Go to episode 159

      Featured Songs

      1. , , , ,
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      Go to episode 121

      Featured Songs

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      16. ,

      Ecclesiastes is part of the Hebrew wisdom literature. It is traditionally ascribed to King Solomon of Israel, who lived and ruled in the 9th century BC. Yet the questions with which the writer wrestled are still relevant, 3,000 years later. It’s the same stuff that college students, songwriters, philosophers, and lay people still wrestle with today.

      There’s a word that’s repeated all through the book—some translations use the word “meaningless”; some translations use the word “vanity”; but the most literal translation of the Hebrew word is “vapor”—like your breath on a winter day. Which means at least two things: First of all, everything in life is very temporary. Like your breath—you see it, and then it’s gone. And then also, it means that just like you can’t grasp your breath, there is a universal tendency to try to grasp and understand life, and yet every time we try to do that, it seems to elude us. So listen for that concept today.

      Solomon was passionate to find meaning and happiness in life, and in today’s passage he talks about one way that he tried to do that. So let’s look at this passage. Actually it’s two passages—Ecclesiastes 1:12-18 and chapter 2:12-17. Here’s what Solomon wrote…

      12 I, the Teacher, was king over Israel in Jerusalem. 13 I applied my mind to study and to explore by wisdom all that is done under the heavens. What a heavy burden God has laid on mankind! 14 I have seen all the things that are done under the sun; all of them are meaningless, a chasing after the wind.

      15 What is crooked cannot be straightened;
          what is lacking cannot be counted.

      16 I said to myself, “Look, I have increased in wisdom more than anyone who has ruled over Jerusalem before me; I have experienced much of wisdom and knowledge.” 17 Then I applied myself to the understanding of wisdom, and also of madness and folly, but I learned that this, too, is a chasing after the wind.

      18 For with much wisdom comes much sorrow;
          the more knowledge, the more grief.

      And then in chapter two, he picks up this same theme:

      12 Then I turned my thoughts to consider wisdom,
          and also madness and folly.
      What more can the king’s successor do
          than what has already been done?
      13 I saw that wisdom is better than folly,
          just as light is better than darkness.
      14 The wise have eyes in their heads,
          while the fool walks in the darkness;
      but I came to realize
          that the same fate overtakes them both.

      15 Then I said to myself,

      “The fate of the fool will overtake me also.
          What then do I gain by being wise?”
      I said to myself,
          “This too is meaningless.”
      16 For the wise, like the fool, will not be long remembered;
          the days have already come when both have been forgotten.
      Like the fool, the wise too must die!

      17 So I hated life, because the work that is done under the sun was grievous to me. All of it is meaningless, a chasing after the wind.

      The two main ideas I want to address are  Pursuing Wisdom and Redefining Wisdom.

      First: Pursuing Wisdom. In all of the Bible, the person who’s most famous for his wisdom is Solomon. This is his claim to fame! The most famous example of that is in 1 Kings chapter 3. Two young women who lived in the same house and who both had an infant son came to Solomon for help. One of the women claimed that the other woman accidentally smothered her own son while they were sleeping and then switched the two babies to make it look like the living child was hers. The other woman said, “No—the living baby is mine—I did not swap the babies.” And they brought their case before Solomon.

      So he called for a sword. And he said, “There’s only one fair solution: we’ll cut the baby in half, and each of you gets half.” And the boy’s true mother said, “No! Give the baby to her, just don’t kill him!” And the other woman said, “No—it shouldn’t belong to either of us. Go ahead and split it.” And Solomon said, “This is the real mother. Because the true mother would never let her child be hurt.” And the case was solved. That’s pretty good, right?

      Solomon was a street-smart, savvy person. He was also well-educated because he grew up in the home of a king. The point is that he was highly qualified—probably as qualified as anyone has been—to understand life from an intellectual perspective.

      And under this first point of Pursuing Wisdom, he talks about three things. First, Its Scope. In verse 13, Solomon specifically defines the realm, or the scope of his search—look what he says: “I applied my mind to study and to explore by wisdom all that is done under the heavens.” And then in verse 14 he says “I have seen all the things that are done under the sun.” Solomon uses that phrase “under the sun” over and over in this book—and here’s what he’s saying, “I limited my search to what I could see with my eyes and perceive with my senses. So I’m talking about things that are empirically provable.”

      And maybe you’re thinking, “Wait a minute—are you telling me King Solomon of Israel didn’t have God as part of his worldview?” And I think the answer is, in Ecclesiastes, he’s talking about a time in his life when he was either doubting deeply (which can happen to anyone); or possibly, he was so confident in his intellectual ability that he tried to make life work without any assistance from God.

      And because of that, Solomon is a great example of where our culture is rapidly moving. Did you see the Pew Research report that came out a couple of weeks ago? There is a growing group of Americans who say, “I don’t identify with any faith; I reject the concept of faith.” And many of those same people say that the only source of really reliable knowledge is science. Peter Atkins, who was a chemistry professor at Oxford, represents this view well—he said, “There is no reason to believe that science cannot deal with every aspect of existence.”

      So even though Solomon lived well before the age of modern science, this is basically the approach he took. He says, “I’m not going to rely on some outside, supernatural source. I’m going to leverage my mind and my education and the power of human reasoning to find happiness and meaning in life.”

      But when he threw himself into that, he found out that approach has its limits. And he expresses that in two ways. The first way is in chapter one verse 15. He says: “What is crooked cannot be straightened…” Which is a very poetic way to say: Life is confusing—it’s crooked; messed up; twisted …and there are questions in this life that even a brilliant person like me can’t get straight. And then he says “what is lacking cannot be counted.” In other words, “This thing I was searching for—meaning in life—was still lacking. And you can’t count or add up or build anything when you’re starting with nothing.

      He also expresses the limits of this search in chapter two, verse 16: “For the wise, like the fool, will not be long remembered; the days have already come when both have been forgotten. Like the fool, the wise too must die!” This is depressing, isn’t it? He says, “Look—consider a guy who gets an elite education and devotes himself to lifelong learning and then consider another guy who watches reality television all day, and both of them will wind up the same in the end: dead.” Right? No matter how wise you are, you’re going to die. They’re going to put you in a box or burn you up, and after a few generations no one will even know you existed. Unless they’re doing some genealogical family tree project for school, and my great, great, great grandchildren are going to ask their parents, “Who was this Dave Gustavsen?” And their parents will say, “I have no idea. Just do your homework.”

      The most brilliant thinking will not unravel life’s biggest questions, and it won’t help us avoid death.

      And therefore, when that’s the realm we function in, here’s how that affects us personally—let’s talk about its End Result. We’re looking at these two passages today, and the last verse in each passage is really a summary of each passage. So look at the last verse in chapter one—verse 18: “For with much wisdom comes much sorrow; the more knowledge, the more grief.” What a poignant thing to say! In some ways, the more we learn about the world, the more sadness we will have. So if this is true, that means the most brilliant, educated people might be some of the least happy people. It’s like they know too much. Ernest Hemingway once said, “Happiness in intelligent people is the rarest thing I know.”

      And then at the end of the second passage—look at Ecclesiastes 2:17,“So I hated life, because the work that is done under the sun was grievous to me. All of it is meaningless, a chasing after the wind.” Like a vapor that you just can’t grab. And I hated life.

      There was a really interesting opinion piece written in the Harvard student newspaper a couple of years ago, in February 2013. And the author, who was an economics major, was trying to figure out why Harvard students have higher-than-average rates of depression and suicide. And his theory was: it’s because they’re so smart. And he quotes something that Woody Allen said: “It’s very hard to keep your spirits up. You’ve got to keep selling yourself a bill of goods, and some people are better at lying to themselves than others. If you face reality too much, it kills you.” And then this Harvard student writes: “My hunch is that being intelligent makes it harder to sell yourself a bill of goods.” Do you see what he’s saying? Less intelligent people can kind of deceive themselves and convince themselves that life has some meaning. But really smart people know better. They look at the universe, and they know in their gut that it has no meaning. And that realization is terrifying and so empty that it can lead to depression, and sometimes to suicide. With much wisdom comes much sorrow; the more knowledge, the more grief.

      We have a little terrier/cockapoo mix named Maggie. And Maggie is a great dog, but just really not smart. A couple of years ago, we put in a little doggie door, right next to the sliding glass door that leads to our backyard. So Maggie can go in and out without us having to open a door for her—it’s great. The problem is, about once a day, Maggie stands in front of the sliding glass door and waits to be let out or let in. And her doggie door is right next to it; but she forgets. She’s like Dory—remember on Finding Nemo? Every day she forgets everything she ever knew. And every time we have to say, “Maggie—use your door!” And she tilts her head, like, “What?” And then finally she goes over, like, “Hey—there’s a little dog-size door right here!” So you see my point, right? She’s low on the IQ scale. But…she’s so happy. I mean, she’s always wagging her tail and licking people and chasing squirrels. She loves life!

      And there is a part of me—and I think there was a part of Solomon—that thought this: I’d rather be dumb and happy—like my dog—rather than being smart and miserable. Because that way, I just wouldn’t know any better, and I could live out my life in blissful ignorance. So when all my Ivy League friends are worrying about global warming and world peace and the emptiness of life, I would just say, “Whatever, dude. It’s happy hour!”

      So maybe that’s the answer: wisdom is overrated; stop thinking so much; and you’ll be happy!

      But as tempting as that is, I don’t like that answer. Because in my heart, I know wisdom is not a bad thing. I know knowledge is a good thing. And we Christians need to be very careful here. Because sometimes Christians have a reputation—and sometimes we deserve it—for being anti-intellectual. When we say, “I don’t care what science has discovered; I’m going to stick with the Bible.” That’s a dangerous and foolish attitude. Because if we’re really interested in pursuing truth, we should be grateful for biology and chemistry and physics and all the other beautiful tools for understanding our world. And if we believe Scripture is true, we should have no fear of exploring truth through science and other scholarly pursuits. Our friend, Jennifer Wiseman, is such a great example of this spirit—because she is a brilliant astronomer with an advanced education and all of her learning hasn’t weakened her faith; it’s strengthened it.

      If you read Ecclesiastes carefully, Solomon is not saying that knowledge and learning are bad; he’s saying they’re incomplete. So maybe if my wisdom and knowledge are leading me to depression, there’s something I’m missing. So let’s talk about Redefining Wisdom.

      Remember the way Solomon defined his search? He limited it to things you can experience and prove with your natural perception, with human reason, under the sun. But something huge happened in history: God chose to enter into our closed system, in the flesh of Jesus Christ. And in the teaching of Jesus, and in the pages of the Bible, we are invited into this larger reality.

      Specifically, the New Testament defines wisdom much differently than Solomon did in Ecclesiastes. And the classic place that’s explained is in 1 Corinthians, chapter one, starting in verse 20. Listen to this:

      20 Where is the wise person? Where is the scholar? Where is the philosopher of this age? Has not God made foolish the wisdom of the world? 21 For since in the wisdom of God the world through its wisdom did not know him, God was pleased through the foolishness of what was preached to save those who believe. 22 Jews demand signs and Greeks look for wisdom, 23 but we preach Christ crucified: a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles, 24 but to those whom God has called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God.

      See, according to the Christian faith, the essence of wisdom is not how much you know; it’s Whom you know. The essence of wisdom is not a philosophical system; it’s a Person. So Paul, who wrote this, says, “We preach Christ crucified.” That’s the center of our message. That’s the core of wisdom. Jesus, giving up his life on the cross. When you see that—when you make that personal and make that the center of your life, you’ll become truly wise.”

      Why? What does “Christ crucified” have to do with being wise? That’s a whole sermon series in itself. But let me just give you a few quick thoughts.

      When I realize that Jesus came to do that for me, I realize there’s a God who loves me, and so my life must have value and meaning. It’s not just an empty vapor.

      When I realize that my problem was so serious that someone needed to die for me, it makes me profoundly humble and aware of my own capacity for darkness.

      When I realize that God was satisfied with the death of Jesus in my place, and based on that he forgave me of all the ways I’ve offended him, it makes me quick to forgive people who offend me.

      When I realize that Jesus didn’t stay dead, but rose again on the third day, it gives me hope for the future—because even though I will physically die, just like Solomon reminded me, I know that’s not the end.

      Do you see how “Christ crucified” has the power to change the way we think about life? And Paul says that message is so simple that it’s offensive to people. It’s sounds foolish and dumb. Some people will say, “That’s it? That’s all you’ve got?” But it’s the essence of real wisdom.

      Now I’m going to be completely honest: what I just said, I can’t prove. I can’t scientifically or logically prove that Jesus is the missing piece that we need in our lives. I can show you evidence for the life of Jesus. I can give you historical support for the reliability of the New Testament documents. I can talk about the unlikely growth and survival of the early church within the Roman Empire in the first couple of centuries A.D. I can point to the ways I’ve seen Jesus affect the lives of people I know in extremely positive ways. But I can’t prove it.

      Ultimately, there’s a step of faith required. Not a blind leap. But a step of faith.

      Some of you have read Yann Martel’s book, Life of Pi. About a boy who survives a shipwreck and winds up on a little life boat with a tiger and some other animals. And in the book, the main character, Pi, says there are really two ways you can look at life. You can view it as a closed system—with no supernatural involvement—everything’s limited to what we can prove and verify. Or you can choose to embrace what he calls “the better story.” You can recognize that life just doesn’t make sense without a larger perspective, where God is behind it and involved in it. That’s the better story. And even though he doesn’t land on a purely Christian view of reality, he makes a valid point: the nature of life is that all of us have to choose which story of reality we’ll embrace.

      Now, does that mean that if we embrace Jesus Christ all the mysteries of life will be solved? All our questions will be answered? No. But they look different. I like the way C.S. Lewis said it: “I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen: not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else.” When Christ is at the center, life just looks different. You don’t have all the answers, but you have value and self-knowledge and forgiveness and hope, to name just a few things. And best of all, you have a relationship with the living God.

      So, please hear the warning of Solomon, even if you have an elite education and an intimidating level of intelligence: apart from God it will not make you happy or satisfied. In fact, it might lead to misery. So if you’re feeling some of that emptiness, maybe it’s God calling you to consider the better story of Jesus Christ, crucified for you.

      __

      Dave Gustavsen is the Senior Pastor at Jacksonville Chapel in Lincoln Park, NJ. He is committed to grace-oriented, gospel-centered ministry that resonates with skeptical, educated people in the New York City area. He blogs atdavegustavsen.com, tweets at @pastordavegus, and is excited about the recent launch of Acts 17, an organization that offers the hope of Christ in the public square by promoting intelligent conversations about key cultural issues. – See more at: http://biologos.org/blogs/archive/ecclesiastes-education-and-the-pursuit-of-meaning#sthash.LW9MN2ea.dpuf

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